Michigan Students Rally Against AD Dave Brandon’s Incompetence

College students are lazy, apathetic creatures who only get excited by free pizza, which makes the fact that hundreds of University of Michigan students protested athletic director Dave Brandon’s continued employment by the school all the more amazing. A “Fire Dave Brandon” rally was held tonight on the campus Diag, essentially the quad. Reports from the scene said that the rally was somewhat disorganized, but there is no doubt that a lot of students showed up:… …read more

Yosemite GM provides an early look at new versions of Pages and Keynote for Mac

On Tuesday Apple provided developers and beta testers with the GM build of OS X Yosemite, which will likely be the version that ships to consumers later in October (although since this is only a “GM candidate” we may see another build sometime before then). Earlier we noted that this build includes updated videos to demonstrate the trackpad gestures in System Preferences that showed off new iWork icons.
As it turns out, those demo videos also give us a quick look at what will almost certainly be the next major version of Apple’s iWork suite. Above you can see an unreleased version of Pages that features a redesigned toolbar and other tweaks. Another of the videos has our first look at the updated Keynote app:

Unfortunately, in the case of Keynote, we can’t see nearly as much, even at the largest available size, because it only appears as a thumbnail in Mission Control. However, a close examination reveals that it has a very similar toolbar to the one seen in the Pages screenshot above. These Yosemite-ready updates will likely be available some time next month, probably at or just after Yosemite becomes publicly available.
Since Apple is widely expected to announce new iPads in October, it makes sense to assume that OS X 10.10 will share the stage with those devices and finally get a solid release date at that time.
Thanks for the tip, Kenny!Filed under: Apps Tagged: 10.10, iWork, keynote, Mac, Numbers, OS X, Pages, yosemite Check out 9to5Mac for more breaking coverage of Apps, Mac, and OS X.What do you think? Discuss “Yosemite GM provides an early look at new versions of Pages and Keynote for Mac” with our community.

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Yosemite GM provides an early look at new versions of Pages and Keynote for Mac

On Tuesday Apple provided developers and beta testers with the GM build of OS X Yosemite, which will likely be the version that ships to consumers later in October (although since this is only a “GM candidate” we may see another build sometime before then). Earlier we noted that this build includes updated videos to demonstrate the trackpad gestures in System Preferences that showed off new iWork icons.
As it turns out, those demo videos also give us a quick look at what will almost certainly be the next major version of Apple’s iWork suite. Above you can see an unreleased version of Pages that features a redesigned toolbar and other tweaks. Another of the videos has our first look at the updated Keynote app:

Unfortunately, in the case of Keynote, we can’t see nearly as much, even at the largest available size, because it only appears as a thumbnail in Mission Control. However, a close examination reveals that it has a very similar toolbar to the one seen in the Pages screenshot above. These Yosemite-ready updates will likely be available some time next month, probably at or just after Yosemite becomes publicly available.
Since Apple is widely expected to announce new iPads in October, it makes sense to assume that OS X 10.10 will share the stage with those devices and finally get a solid release date at that time.
Thanks for the tip, Kenny!Filed under: Apps Tagged: 10.10, iWork, keynote, Mac, Numbers, OS X, Pages, yosemite Check out 9to5Mac for more breaking coverage of Apps, Mac, and OS X.What do you think? Discuss “Yosemite GM provides an early look at new versions of Pages and Keynote for Mac” with our community.

…read more

Stage Door: Uncle Vanya

Life in Czarist Russia at the turn of the 20th century is bleak. The general malaise infects eco-forward Dr. Astrov, estate manager Vanya and his niece Sonya, while the serfs have little expectation of relief. Russia may be two decades away from the Bolshevik Revolution, but Uncle Vanya, now off-Broadway at the Pearl Theatre, offers a glimpse of a country on the verge of a nervous breakdown.
Like Ibsen, Chekhov is a key figure in the birth of modernism in the theater, albeit with a distinctly Russian sense of foreboding. The doctor, in the guise of the playwright, bemoans: “The climate is changing for the worse, every day the planet gets poorer and uglier.”
Charting the misery of his beloved Russia on the brink is Chekhov’s artistry. He is adept at heartbreak, exposing the raw yearnings of those caught between desire and obligation. Broken people, broken relationships destroyed by inertia and indifference are his specialty. Uncle Vanya is set on an estate populated by a sterile, controlling academic, his disappointed young wife and overworked relations. While Vanya isn’t as dramatically tense as Chekhov’s Three Sisters or The Seagull, it is prescient in tone. Replete with literary giants — Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Pushkin and Gogol — Russia lagged behind burgeoning democratic movements worldwide. The play addresses women’s rights, power imbalances and ecological issues, though Russia has yet to be roused from its tyrannical slumber.
In Uncle Vanya, only two characters, a bloviated, dry academic (Dominic Cuskern) and his wife Yelena (Rachel Botchan), the object of desire for both Vanya and Dr. Astrov (Bradford Cover), have a scintilla of ease. In turn, Astrov has bewitched Sonya (Michelle Beck).
Vanya and Sonya run the family estate, sacrificing their own needs to send earnings to her father, the pompous professor. His arrival signals the realization of profound unhappiness; their routine subverted, their misery increases exponentially. Is it too late to repair?
Paul Schmidt’s translation is unerringly modern, the word “freak” is repeatedly used, as is the directorial style. But the strife and longing of the Russian soul is ever-present. The catch — Vanya is more depression than drama. The painting that hangs on the wall in act two is telling — a ship on rough waters threatens to capsize. Yet the need to sail on, whatever the hardships, remains.
Chekhov’s larger vision is evident in Astrov’s desire to preserve the forests for future generations, one of the more …read more